Ruffled Hair Fraser Sweatshirt

How do you all feel about ruffles?

Since I started reading The Curated Closet, I keep thinking about the styles I admire versus the styles I would actually wear.  I’ve decided that I admire pretty much anything and everything.  Seriously, I’m making a style file right now and paring it down is the hardest part.  Send help!

I have made one breakthrough so far: I know that I like “cute,” but I won’t usually wear it.  It’s hard to define what I actually mean by cute.  I’ll list some things to help clarify: frilly lace blouses, novelty print dresses, kitschy necklaces, bows, peter pan collars and pearl buttons.  Get the idea?  I ADORE them all, but when I wear them as advertised I feel like I’m playing dress up.  So I’m learning that I can take a few of these elements and make them work for me.  For example, I can handle a little frill when it’s on a simple knit top in a graphic print.  Just the right amount of cute for me.

I think it might actually be hard to see the ruffle in this awesome print.  It’s a polyester scuba knit I purchased from Fabric Mart back in February.  It was an impulse buy, but I just loved all the cute hairstyles.  I like that it’s very bold with the black and white, and that from far away it reads a little more abstract.  I got a little bit of giggling and side eye from my sisters over the print, but even though they would never wear this sort of design in a million years, it feels very “me.”

For this top, I used the the Sewaholic Fraser sweatshirt pattern (View B).  I’ve made it five times before; at least once in every view.  So it really should have been a quick and easy make.  However, it’s been almost two years since I last used the pattern, and I had really hacked it up.  Long story short: the sleeve head is symmetric, so it does not matter that there are no notches on the pattern to indicate front and back.  (To be clear, I think the fit of the sleeve/armscye is just fine, I just wish the pattern told you not to worry about front vs. back.)

I’ve made this pattern so many times because of the versatility (the different versions are fun for color blocking and using scraps!) and the fact that there’s no hemming to do (great, because I hate the twin needle with a passion).  There are bands to finish the neckline, sleeves, and hem.  I think that the next time I make it I will size up for a real sweatshirt fit.  So far I’ve really only used it to make slim knit tops.

I created the ruffle pattern piece myself, based on some photos of similar garments, as well as my niece’s onesie (see what I mean by admiring the cute?).  It was quite simple to make, so I made a little diagram showing how I did it.

This is not the end of ruffles for me, by the way!  I have a couple more variations of this trend planned – partially because I can’t get enough, and partially because I’m putting off making what I really need: a winter coat!

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Comments

  1. kalimak

    The sweatshirt is really cool. The fabric is unique in how it conceals its cuteness 😉
    I’m still mulling over The Curated Closet myself… trying to feel out the dividing line between what I admire and what I would actually wear.

    I like the ruffle on your Fraser but I probably wouldn’t be too tempted to add ruffles… but then again, my choice to err on the side of minimalism has at times landed me in some really severe-looking and not at all cool outfits. Softening the look — that’s something pretty elusive for me but also something I need to look into.

    I’m really curious to see where your style exploration will lead. Your recent makes have incredibly clever details — the double topstitching on your Kalle shirtdress butterfly collar has really moved my imagination 🙂

    1. Post
      Author
      Henna

      I know what you mean. I used to leave off extra details while sewing in favor of what I thought was a more wearable or versatile garment, and then would be disappointed when the look turned out a lot more drab than I had envisioned. Styling probably has a lot to do with it, but also the color, drape and texture of the fabric. I feel like these are issues everyone has, but it’s harder when you make your own clothes because you really don’t know what it will look like until you’ve made it. Plus pushing yourself out of your comfort zone is a lot harder than it looks!

  2. Lisa

    I have never finished Wardrobe Architect for the same reason you are struggling—I like so many styles and colors! It’s really hard to narrow down. It has been helpful to try to separate what I like to look at and what I will actually wear, however. I think you really managed to incorporate that little bit of cute into this pattern.

    1. Post
      Author
      Henna

      Yes, it’s so hard to narrow down! Haha I used to wonder if I actually liked everything or if I was just super susceptible to advertising. The next step is to go out to stores and try things on. I guess I’ll see if I really do like everything when I wear it!

  3. Elizabeth Farr

    This is such a fun top! I love the added ruffle–it’s a nice touch and it gives a great focal point. I think sometimes with big graphic prints like this, your eye can wander all over the place because of the print, but the ruffle adds the perfect touch of balance!

    1. Post
      Author
      Henna

      Thanks! I think you’re right about the need for balance – I always worry that the loud prints I so love will end up wearing me instead of the other way around. I’m glad this one works!

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